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Score IT!

Junior  /  Senior  /  Plus
 

Score IT! Competition 2019

2019 WINNERS ANNOUNCED!

Score IT! Junior 2019 

1st Place: Jack Curry

2nd Place: Harrison Wilkes

3rd Place: Kaito Nelson

Check out the winning score by Jack Curry here

Score IT! Senior 2019

1st Place: Elliena Escott

2nd Place: Imogen Ferdinando

3rd Place: Miguel Cescotto

Check out the winning score by Elliena Escott here

Score IT! Plus 2019

1st Place: Lachlan Moulds

2nd Place: William Elvin 

3rd Place: Andrew Udal

Honorable Mention: Tara Lynam

Check out the winning score by Lachlan Moulds here.

Score IT! welcomes students from across the state to put their film composition skills to the ultimate test. This free to enter competition challenges students in a practical environment, offering real world experience by preparing an original composition to accompany a short animation film.

Music transforms a film’s narrative, enchanting and captivating the audience and Score IT! allows students to let their creativity run wild. Score IT! offers students an educational stepping stone to hone their skills and gain invaluable industry experience.

Competition Categories

The animation films are prepared by Griffith Film School and are offered for three categories.

 

Based on year level, students compete in either Score IT! Junior or Senior by composing and recording a soundtrack using instruments of their choice. The more challenging Score IT! Plus is open to all secondary students, requiring composition for specific instruments and submission of a written score.

 

JUDGING PANEL

Entrants are judged by an expert panel including Katie Noonan, and award-winning screen composer and orchestrator, Cameron Patrick, known for orchestrating films such as Spider-Man: Homecoming for Marvel, Star Trek Into Darkness for Paramount; and Jurassic World for Universal; as well as industry leaders from Griffith Film School and Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University.

 

PRIZING

Score IT! finalists will be invited to take part in a workshop program in Brisbane from 24th - 26th July with composition workshops and masterclasses led by senior lecturers and practitioners from the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University, and a half day workshop with top video and digital school, Queensland School of Film and TV. Our Score IT! Plus winner will receive an extra composition workshop, a recording session and have their winning score performed at the Awards Ceremony by students from the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University. Score IT! finalists will receive some great prizes, including professional recording equipment.

For regional finalists, travel and accommodation costs will be covered by Queensland Music Festival to bring the selected student and a guardian to Brisbane for the July Score IT! activities outlined here.

The program launches 29 January 2019 with entries closing 24 May 2019.

2019 Schedule

Wednesday 24 July 2019

Score IT! Plus Masterclass

For our Score IT! Plus finalists only – An advanced workshop conducted by Cameron Patrick.

‘Composing for Film’ Masterclass

For all Score IT! finalists – An hour-long intensive workshop on composing for film with Cameron Patrick.

Thursday 25 July 2019

Queensland School of Film & Television Workshop

A hands-on workshop in which finalists will learn how to create, shoot and edit a short film.

 

Score IT! Awards Ceremony

The results are in! The winners of each category are announced at the Score IT! Awards Ceremony, with the winning Score IT! Plus composition performed live by students of the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University.

 

Friday 26 July 2019

APRA AMCOS Guest Composer In-Conversation

Guest composer announced closer to the date.

 

 

Cameron Patrick Public Lecture

Cameron Patrick will once again deliver an entertaining lecture on composing for film. Cameron has had first-hand experience in the film and entertainment industry for over two decades as a musician, composer and orchestrator.

Supporters

Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University

Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University has been an enthusiastic supporter of Queensland Music Festival’s (QMF) Score IT! initiative since 2009. Students have the opportunity to learn and work with our leading faculty in masterclasses and workshops. The winning Score IT! Plus composition is recorded and performed by students from the Conservatorium.

Queensland Conservatorium is one of Australia’s leading music and performing arts schools, offering a wide variety of specialist degrees, from classical music, jazz, opera, and popular music to musical theatre, acting, creative music technology and music education. Music and performing arts students at Griffith learn in state-of-the-art spaces from award-winning teachers dedicated to producing polished music professionals of the highest calibre.

Queensland Conservatorium alumni can be found gracing the stages of Carnegie Hall, Covent Garden, the Metropolitan Opera and the Concertgebouw. Queensland Music Festival Artistic Director Katie Noonan is a graduate of the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University.

Griffith Film School

Griffith Film School has been an enthusiastic supporter of Queensland Music Festival’s (QMF) Score IT! initiative since 2009, providing animations for re-scoring by high school students. By connecting animators and musicians Griffith Film School is supporting emerging talent across the arts.

 

Griffith Film School is the largest film school in Australia, and our teachers, students and industry partners are constantly pushing the boundaries of the animation industry — something  you would expect from a University ranked as the top Creative Arts School in Australia.*

Our animation students work across Art Direction, 2D, 3D and VFX specialisations, engage with industry and have the opportunity to work for real world clients through LiveLab as part of their studies.

Griffith Animation graduates can be found working in local studios such as Cutting Edge, Ludo Studio, Liquid Animation, Pixel Zoo Animation Studios and Alt.VFX, and worldwide for DreamWorks, Industrial Light & Magic, Double Negative and Sony Pictures Imageworks.

*Uni Reviews 2017

Score IT! is presented by Queensland Music Festival and Brisbane City Council
Major Partners
Silver Partners
Bronze Partners

Score IT! Junior – SPROUT

A clumsy gardener forms an unlikely friendship…

APPLICATIONS FOR SCORE IT! COMPETITION 2019 ARE NOW CLOSED
How to enter

 

Step 1 – Register for Score IT! to receive regular updates regarding the Score IT! competition

Step 2Download and watch the Score IT! Junior film, Sprout

Step 3 – Read the Criteria and Director’s Musical Brief (below) and create a musical composition to accompany the film

Step 4 – Render the film with your composition embedded as a single sound-track and saved as a .mov, .qt, .avi or .mp4 file

Step 5 – Complete the Score IT! Entry Form online and attach the Dropbox file-sharing link to your composition.

 

Post – Send your composition on DVD with your completed Entry Form to: Score IT!, Queensland Music Festival, PO Box 1060, Fortitude Valley, QLD, 4006

Email – Send your composition and completed Entry Form to scoreit@qmf.org.au. We recommend sending your file via Dropbox.  

 

Please save your file using your first name, surname and category  eg. John.Smith.Junior  

 

*when using publicly accessed video sharing sites, please ensure you keep the file private and allow scoreit@qmf.org.au viewing and downloading rights.

 

Film Credits

Run time: 3:05

 

Director/Script/Storyboards

Bernice Choong

 

Producer

Jason Rauwerda

 

Musician

Timothy Clark

 

Concept Artist

Bernice Choong

 

Modellers

Ashleigh Gauld

Bernice Choong

Jack Clark

Jason Rauwerda

Jennifer Daniell

Katie Giefer

Leon Warren

Logan Pitcher

 

Texture Artists

Bernice Choong

Jason Rauwerda

 

Rigger

Jason Rauwerda

 

Animators

Bernice Choong

Christopher Stefanac

Ellen Clark

Jack Campbell

Jennifer Daniell

Leon Warren

Manuel Acevedo

 

Lighting Artist

Jason Rauwerda

Ryan Turner

 

Sound Recorder/Designer & Video Editor

Christopher Stefanac

 

Supervisor

Louise Harvey

 

Director’s Musical Brief

 

Sprout is about an inexperienced and clumsy gardener who is determined to transform her lacklustre garden into something worthy of winning the annual flower competition. While fumbling through her day to day and harming her garden more than improving it, Lily notices that one of her onions has sprouted into a sentient little being. The two form an unlikely friendship and couple-up to revitalise the garden and bring it up to par.

It is a non-dialogue film; therefore, it relies on music to support the mood and atmosphere of each scene. The film begins in the morning, with Lily adjusting the flower competition poster. It should have a calm and gentle start that has a sense of reassurance, as she feels confident in her gardening abilities. After she harvests the onions, she begins to make mistakes, and the music should become muddy, perhaps dipping into minor keys, to reflect this.

 

In the next scene, she feels defeated when she kneels to retrieve the fallen onions. When one of the onions move, the music should convey playfulness and curiosity. The tempo should hasten when she begins to chase after Onion. When she catches him, the music could pause, slow down, or soften to emphasise that the chase sequence is over.

Sweet, feel-good music should begin when the duo start working together in the garden. When Onion rubs his head in pain, a falter in the music’s melody could be used to symbolise something is amiss. Lily checks on the basket of onions to find that they are infected with mould, and immediately seeks out her friend. The music should sound foreboding but stay soft like in previous scenes. She finds him lifeless and mourns over him. The aim of the music is to build suspense and conclude on sadness and longingness. The next day, Lily wakes up to find that Onion has grown into a vibrant, red flower. The music should sound hopeful as the film ends.

Overall, the music should be soothing, gentle and soft, but these qualities can lessen in the scene where the negative events play. Use of woodwind and string instruments are preferred. Music from The Little Prince can be used as inspiration. Most of this brief is to be taken as a suggestion to help if you are looking for ideas, or to help start your composition.

 

Criteria

  1. The composer has skilfully manipulated musical elements and compositional devices to create cohesive music to support their chosen film.

  2. The composition effectively and convincingly realises the dramatic intent of the Film as specified by the Director’s Musical Brief.

  3. The composer has presented an original and imaginative composition that is distinctive and demonstrates creativity and an understanding of film composition.

  4. The composition demonstrates originality of soundtrack e.g. use of instruments (electronic or instrumental) and avoids the use of stock music or previously written or recorded music.

 

Judging

The entries will be judged according to the supplied criteria.

The judging panel will select three semi-finalists (and in some instances an honourable mention) for each category from which one finalist will be awarded as the winner. The winner will be announced at the Award Ceremony to be held in Brisbane on Thursday 25 July 2019.

 

FAQs

CAN I ENTER MORE THAN ONE CATEGORY?

Yes, you can enter more than one category depending on your year level. For example, students can enter Junior and Plus or Senior and Plus.

WHAT CAN I WIN?

  • Two return airfares and accommodation to Brisbane, for finalist and supervising adult to attend the Award Ceremony on Thursday 25 July 2019

  • Masterclass with Cameron Patrick

  • Workshop at Queensland School of Film & Television, on how to make a film

  • Two tickets to the Cameron Patrick public lecture on Friday 26 July 2019

  • Opportunity to meet the Griffith Film School Filmmakers about possible collaborations in the future

  • + RØDE AI-1 Complete Studio Kit

WHAT DOES IT COST?

Score IT! is free to enter and does not have any registration or other fees.

If you chose to mail in your composition and score all costs including DVD and mailing charges are the responsibility of each entrant.

Should airfares and accommodation not be required by the finalist, other travel allowances may be made available. All food, incidentals and personal costs related to the Brisbane trip are at the cost of finalist.

 

Score IT! Senior – LONGAWN

A lone man on the remote frontiers of the Australian outback has conceded defeat to the harsh environment and prepares to abandon his home…Yet the desert is not as empty as it seems.

APPLICATIONS FOR SCORE IT! COMPETITION 2019 ARE NOW CLOSED
How to enter

 

Step 1 – Register for Score IT! to receive regular updates regarding the Score IT! competition

Step 2Download and watch the Score IT! Senior film, Longawn

Step 3 – Read the Criteria and Director’s Musical Brief (below) and create a musical composition to accompany the film

Step 4 – Render the film with your composition embedded as a single sound-track and saved as a .mov, .qt, .avi or .mp4 file

Step 5 – Complete the Score IT! Entry Form online and attach the Dropbox file-sharing link to your composition.

 

Post – Send your composition on DVD with your completed Entry Form to: Score IT!, Queensland Music Festival, PO Box 1060, Fortitude Valley, QLD, 4006

Email – Send your composition and completed Entry Form to scoreit@qmf.org.au. We recommend sending your file via Dropbox.  

 

Please save your file using your first name, surname and category  eg. Jane.Doe.Senior  

 

*when using publicly accessed video sharing sites, please ensure you keep the file private and allow scoreit@qmf.org.au viewing and downloading rights.

 

Film Credits

Run time: 03:45

 

Director

Helix Phelan-Badgery

 

Producer

Emily Cameron

 

Music

Luke Zahnleiter

 

Sound

Sam Muller

 

Concept Development

Naomi Hurrey

 

Visual Development

Zou Kaihan

Liang Ruochen

 

Storyboards

Zou Kaihan

Naomi Hurrey

Helix Phelan-Badgery

 

Fabrication

Helix Phelan-Badgery

Maddy Healy

Jeromie Navin

 

Stop Motion Animation

Helix Phelan-Badgery

 

Eye Tracking/Animation

Jeromie Navin

Helix Phelan-Badgery

 

VFX

Jason Rauwerda

Jeromie Navin

 

Clean Up/Compositing

Alex Futo

May Ringdahl

Jeromie Navin

Helix Phelan-Badgery

 

Supervisors

Peter Moyes

Michael Linhart

 

Director’s Musical Brief

 

Brief story summary

In Longawn, we follow a man as he attempts to ‘escape’ his decaying home in the harsh Australian outback. He first visits the grave of a lost loved one and then begins a desperate run toward the horizon. As he passes tufts of desert grass they awaken into ravenous creatures. The strange creatures pursue and attack the man and finally we see him in his dying moments … totally defeated and soon to be absorbed into the landscape.

 

The Score

The score for Longawn will play a crucial role in engaging and guiding the audience and complimenting and enhancing the film’s themes. I think of the film as a ‘mood piece’. That is, attention to the ‘plot’ will ideally be outweighed by the emotional and visceral experience of the film. The audience should be wrapped up in the visual and aural textures and the themes and emotions they evoke… similar to the feeling of listening to a beautiful song or piece of music. The score will be perhaps the most important factor in creating this mood and potent emotional feeling.

I would like the music to reflect the momentousness (for the character) of each scene:

  • When the man is leaving his house, he knows that he is facing his probable demise

  • When he visits the shrine/grave, his heart aches with grief and longing and perhaps a glimmer of hope that he might somehow be reunited with this lost loved one. He leaves his hat on the fence post because he realises that he isn’t going to make it.

 

Style Ideas

I believe many styles of music could work for this film. Some possibilities that come to mind are as follows:

The original score was ethereal and dreamy using deep drones, synths and guitar. During the chase, the music had a beat and greater energy/intensity. This is the kind of sound I had envisioned, however I could also imagine a string composition having a similar qualities in terms of emotional impact/intensity etc.

Another idea could be to take inspiration and conventions from relevant genres. This could be in earnest or possibly even hyperbolic and funny. For example, from Sergio Leone “Spaghetti” Westerns: surf guitar/rattle sound for the sun. From Horror/Monster movies: analog synth sounds a la the scores of John Carpenter.

In the final scene, the camera pulls away from the dying/dead man as the creatures are consuming him. This final scene is long and will likely be a major point where the score will take the foreground and set the final mood/emotion for the audience. It would seem fitting for music here to be poignant/sad/overwhelming. Another possibility worth considering is setting this scene to triumphant or happy pop music. I had fun testing this with various songs (eg: Achy Breaky Heart) and I think something like this could possibly be very effective as an alternate approach.

 

Guiding Themes and Relevant Adjectives

The brutally harsh environment (searing desert sun)

  • Isolation

  • Loss/grief

  • Sombre

  • Desolate

  • Gritty

 

Criteria

  1. The composer has skilfully manipulated musical elements and compositional devices to create cohesive music to support their chosen film.

  2. The composition effectively and convincingly realises the dramatic intent of the FIlm as specified by the Director’s Musical Brief.

  3. The composer has presented an original and imaginative composition that is distinctive and demonstrates creativity and an understanding of film composition.

  4. The composition demonstrates originality of soundtrack e.g. use of instruments (electronic or instrumental) and avoids the use of stock music or previously written or recorded music.

Judging

The judging panel will select three semi-finalists (and in some instances an honourable mention) for each category from which one finalist will be awarded as the winner. The winner will be announced at the Award Ceremony to be held in Brisbane on Wednesday 24 July 2019.

Judges will be scoring on the basis of:

  • 20 % Musicality

  • 10 % Technical Proficiency

  • 25% Dramatic Tension

  • 25% Originality

  • 20 % Overall Excellence

FAQs

CAN I ENTER MORE THAN ONE CATEGORY?

Yes, you can enter more than one category depending on your year level. For example, students can enter Junior and Plus or Senior and Plus.

WHAT CAN I WIN?

  • Two return airfares and accommodation to Brisbane, for finalist and supervising adult to attend the Award Ceremony on Thursday 25 July 2019

  • Masterclass with Cameron Patrick

  • Workshop at Queensland School of Film & Television, on how to make a film

  • Two tickets to the Cameron Patrick public lecture on Friday 26 July 2019

  • Opportunity to meet the Griffith Film School Filmmakers about possible collaborations in the future  

  • + RØDE  AI-1 Complete Studio Kit

 

WHAT DOES IT COST?

Score IT! is free to enter and does not have any registration or other fees.

If you chose to mail in your composition and score all costs including DVD and mailing charges are the responsibility of each entrant.

Should airfares and accommodation not be required by the finalist, other travel allowances may be made available. All food, incidentals and personal costs related to the Brisbane trip are at the cost of finalist.

 

Score IT! Plus – CAUGHT!

When a deep bond flourishes between two boys, a hairy secret and a devoted mother unknowingly stands between them.

APPLICATIONS FOR SCORE IT! COMPETITION 2019 ARE NOW CLOSED
 
How to enter

 

Step 1 – Register for Score IT! to receive regular updates regarding the Score IT! competition

Step 2 – Watch the Score IT! Plus film Caught!

Step 3 -Read the Criteria and Director’s Musical Brief

Step 4 – Read Cam’s Composing Tips

Step 5Download the film and create a musical composition to accompany the film

Step 6 – Create a PDF of your final score (no instrumental parts – just the full score)

Step 7 – Create a music notation file of your score (in Sibelius, Finale or similar)*

Step 8 – Render the film with a synthesised version of your score synced and embedded as a Quicktime file

Step 9 – Complete the Score IT! Entry Form online and attach the file-sharing link to your composition.

 

Email – Send your composition, copy of your score and completed Entry Form to scoreit@qmf.org.au. We recommend sending your file via a file sharing service** such as Dropbox Vimeo, YouTube, Viddler or Google Drive etc.

Please save your file using your first name, surname and category eg. John.Smith.Plus

*your Score IT! Plus submission will not be eligible for judging without the PDF of the final score and music notation file of the score to accompany the rendered film.

 

**when using publicly accessed video sharing sites, please ensure you keep the file private and allow scoreit@qmf.org.au viewing and downloading rights.

Film Credits

Run time: 04:30

Pre-Production

Corey Morgan

Producer

Ashleigh Gauld

 

Director

Corey Morgan

 

Writer

Corey Morgan

 

Animators

Corey Morgan

Caitlin O’Brien

Iona Murray

Joyce Mekonnen

Matthew Simonds

Xena Achilleos

Leon Warren

 

Colourists

Ashleigh Stuhmcke

Leon Warren

 

Background Artists

Olivia Rea

Naomi Hurrey

Corey Morgan

 

Post Production

Ashleigh Gauld

Claire Brooks

 

Music

Emma Thompson

 

Music Producer

Josh Hartridge

 

Supervisor

Peter Moyes

Director’s Musical Brief

CAUGHT! is a film about the bond two boys make under the watchful gaze of an upset mother, and the score should reflect this. With a very organic flow, and a focus on montages, CAUGHT! relies on the music to tie the flow of the plot together neatly. There is no foley, dialogue, or sound effects, so the composition should enrapture the audience and connect them to the bonds being tightly formed and heartbreakingly broken. Music can convey more emotions than words ever can, so it’s important that the tone is appropriate to the primary plot points.

The music should be organic to suit the focus on natural environments. Stringed instruments would especially fit the aesthetic well!

 

The beginning should start slowly and cautiously, infusing the story with a sense of growing curiosity as the two boys meet. Their hands connecting is a major recurring visual symbol in the film, one that represents trust and compassion, so try to score that gesture consistently every time it happens to help knit the film together.

 

When the boys meet Eddie’s mother for the first time, there should be hesitation within the score as Liam (the wolf boy) meets her. Keep it anxious but still light, and wipe away the anxiety as Eddie takes Liam’s hand to drag him into the house. Have something ominous looming around the mother as it focuses on her before cutting to the montage.

 

A note from Cam:

Occasionally there are brief flashes of images that are black silhouettes on a red background. The first time this happens is in this scene at 1:06. These images represent the mother seeing things differently to how they are in reality … usually in a darker and more disturbing way … and the Director refers to them as the “seeing red” aspects of the film. He wants these images to be scored consistently throughout the film, building to the main conflict scene where they play a big part.

Back to the Director’s Musical Brief:

The montage is about connecting with the boys and their friendship, so make it fun! They’re having a ball getting to know each other, so having the audience feel that too would be fantastic. Some anxiety should creep in as the storm clouds come closer, but as the hands connect the feeling of trust and compassion should sweep in and wash it out.

As the rain fades in, keep the atmosphere calm. The tension should only rise as the mother is introduced into the scene. Once she’s there, build the tension quickly and to a high level. It should continue to grow until the screen cuts to black, where Liam is then thrown against the wall. The tension should turn into blistering disappointment as Eddie turns to his mother.

 

When the field comes into view, keep the music sad, slow, and quiet. The boys reuniting is THE BIG MOMENT! As the emotional climax of the film, this is the exact place where you want the audience to start crying, and it’s the music’s job to make them feel it. When those boys connect for the hug, that’s where the trust, compassion, and love for each other should be musically exploited. Please make it beautiful!

 

As the mother enters the scene, there should be hesitation as the boys consider what to do before Liam steps forward. The music should fall away as Liam runs over and stands before her. The audience should be holding their breath at this point waiting to see what happens so perhaps complete quiet here would be most effective. When Liam sticks his hand out, hold the tension until it pans up to his face before relaxing. The relief felt by the mother should be emphasised with the score. The rest should be a pleasant wrap-up of the plot!

 

Criteria

  1. The composer has presented a full score for the specified instrumentation with ALL metronome marks and tempo changes clearly indicated throughout the score and the score written in concert pitch, with nothing transposed. For a more full explanation of concert pitch and transposing instruments, see Cam’s Composing Tips (include link).Note: When exporting your score to PDF format, please double check and make sure the music for the transposing instruments is not transposed during the conversion process.  Remember, the score is to be in concert pitch!

  2. The composer has provided a digital PDF of the final score in either portrait or landscape orientation. (NO instrumental parts … just the score). A suggested score layout is available in downloadable PDF format here (include link).

  3. The composer has provided a music notation file of the score (in Sibelius, Finale, MuseScore or similar).

  4. The composer has provided a digital Quicktime version of the film with a synthesized/sampled mock-up of the score synched and embedded.

  5. The score effectively and convincingly realises the dramatic intent of the Film as specified by the Director’s Musical Brief.

  6. The composer has presented an original, creative and imaginative composition that demonstrates a comprehensive understanding of film music composition.

  7. The composer has scored the film from the opening frame of the film (after the countdown leader and 2-pip) through to the final card of the end credits: “QMF.ORG.AU/SCORE-IT.”

Note: Under NO circumstances are students to replace the current music credits on CAUGHT! with their own name as composer. Doing so destroys the “blind” judging aspect of the competition. Tampering with the credits will immediately disqualify your entry.

 

Instrumentation

Note: It is a requirement that students write for all 4 woodwind players and their instruments; all 3 brass players and their instruments; and all 5 string players and their instruments as listed in the ensemble below. The student must also write for at least one (1) percussionist. If necessary, the student may write for a second percussionist. There is to be no more than two (2) percussionists.

  • 1 x flute

  • 1 x oboe

  • 1 x b-flat clarinet

  • 1 x bassoon

  • 1 x b-flat trumpet

  • 1 x French horn

  • 1 x trombone (tenor)

  • 2 x violins (1 x first violin, 1 x second violin)

  • 1 x viola

  • 1 x cello

  • 1 x double bass

  • 1 or 2 x percussion (no large keyboard percussion instruments, only instruments from the list below)

 

PERCUSSION

Students can choose from the following list of percussion instruments:

  • snare drum

  • bass drum

  • timpani (maximum of 3 drums: 1×32”, 1×29”, 1×26”)

  • tam-tam

  • suspended cymbal

  • tambourine

  • small shaker

  • wood block

  • temple blocks

  • castanets

  • cow bell

  • triangle

  • mark tree

  • bell tree

  • glockenspiel

  • chimes (tubular bells)

 

You are not required to write for all the percussion instruments listed above. You may select a manageable number of percussion instruments from the list to use in the score.

Keep in mind the time it takes for a player to move from instrument to instrument, and to change mallets and sticks. You must allow a few beats rest – or sometimes a few bars rest – for the player to move to a new instrument and to pick up a new set of sticks or mallets if necessary.

If you write for two (2) percussionists, the players must not swap instruments. For example, if Percussionist #1 plays the snare drum, then they must always play the snare drum, and Percussionist #2 cannot. The snare drum becomes part of Percussionist #1’s instrument setup and will not be played at any point by Percussionist #2.

NOTE: It is helpful if all parts for each percussionist are consolidated onto one staff. Click here to download the PDF of the score layout.

 

Cam’s Composing Tips

Our judge, Cameron Patrick, has provided some tips to help you with your composition. You can download these here:

  • Download Cam’s Composing Tips  [see PDF in dropbox]

  • Download Cam’s Composing Tips – Extras: Concert Pitch & Transposing Instruments 1  [see PDF in dropbox]

  • Download Cam’s Composing Tips – Extras: Concert Pitch & Transposing Instruments 2   [see PDF in dropbox]

 

Judging

Score IT! Plus will be judged by award-winning screen composer and orchestrator, Cameron Patrick, who will select three semi-finalists for the Plus category, from which one finalist will be awarded as the winner. The winner of Score IT! Plus will see their orchestration come to life, live at the Award Ceremony on Wednesday 24 July 2019.

FAQs

CAN I ENTER MORE THAN ONE CATEGORY?

Yes, you can enter more than one category depending on your year level. For example, students can enter Junior and Plus or Senior and Plus.

WHAT CAN I WIN?

  • Two return airfares and accommodation to Brisbane, for finalist and supervising adult to attend the Award Ceremony on Thursday 25 July 2019

  • Masterclass with Cameron Patrick

  • Two tickets to the Cameron Patrick public lecture on Friday 26 July 2019

  • Winning composition will be recorded with the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University ensemble

  • Winning composition will be performed live by musicians from the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University ensemble

  • The winner’s name will appear on a special title card as Composer (replacing the film’s original composer) in the end credits of the version of ‘Caught!’ screened at the Score IT! Awards Ceremony/performance and on the version of the film provided to the winner.

  • The winner will have a meeting with the Director and Producer of 'Caught!' to discuss the film and its newly-composed winning score and the possibility of future collaborations. (TBC)

  • The winner will have a chance to conduct their score through a couple of times (using a click track under the Conductor’s supervision) with the Queensland Conservatorium Ensemble at their first rehearsal.

  • + RØDE  AI-1 Complete Studio Kit

 

WHAT DOES IT COST?

Score IT! is free to enter and does not have any registration or other fees.

If you chose to mail in your composition and score all costs including DVD and mailing charges are the responsibility of each entrant.

Should airfares and accommodation not be required by the finalist, other travel allowances may be made available. All food, incidentals and personal costs related to the Brisbane trip are at the cost of finalist.

 
Queensland Music Festival 2019
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